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Kamagra jelly is a drug used to treat male erectile dysfunction. Kamagra jellies main component is Sildenafil, also known as Viagra (trade name). Kamagra jelly works by influencing nitrous oxide on the arterial smooth muscle of blood vessels in the cavernous body of the male penis. Sildenafil itself does not directly cause penile erections. Instead it affects the response towards sexual stimuli. Nitrous oxide is released during sexual stimulation which then activates the enzyme guanylate cyclase, which results in increased levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate, leading to smooth muscle relaxation and inflow of blood to the corpus cavernosum of the penis thus leading to an erection. Sildenafil actually enhances the effect of nitrous oxide by inhibiting phosphodiesterase type 5, which is responsible for the breakdown of cyclic guanosine monophosphate in the corpus cavernosum of the penis. When sexual stimulation causes release of nitrous oxide, inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 by sildenafil causes increased levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate leading to smooth muscle relaxation and increased inflow of blood into the penis, leading to stronger and longer erections.

Buy Kamagra oral jelly Sydney Australia

Buy Kamagra oral jelly Sydney Australia

Contraindications are hypersensitivity to sildenafil or any component of the formulation; concurrent use (regularly/intermittently) of organic nitrates in any form (such as nitroglycerin or isosorbide dinitrate), and concomitant use of riociguat (a guanylate cyclase stimulator).
According to the manufacturers of protease inhibitors (atazanavir, darunavir, fosamprenavir, indinavir, lopinavir/ritonavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir, tipranavir), concurrent use with a protease inhibitor regimen when sildenafil is used for pulmonary artery hypertension (eg, Revatio) should not occur.
Other contraindications are prior episodes of non arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.
Warnings include sudden decrease or loss of hearing, ringing in the ears and dizziness associated with hearing loss. A direct relationship between therapy and hearing loss has not been determined as of yet. Hypotension may occur due to the vasodilator effect of the medication and should be used in caution with left ventricular outflow, those on antihypertensive therapy, with resting hypotension (BP <90/50 mm Hg), fluid depletion, or autonomic dysfunction; may be more sensitive to hypotensive actions. Patients should be hemodynamically stable prior to initiating therapy at the lowest possible dose. Monitor blood pressure when combining with medications that lower blood pressure. Substantial consumption of ethanol may increase the risk of hypotension and orthostasis. Lower ethanol consumption has not been associated with significant changes in blood pressure or increase in orthostatic symptoms. Have patients avoid or limit ethanol consumption.
Adverse effects flushing, headache, dyspepsia, visual disturbances including vision color changes, blurred vision, and photophobia, nosebleeds, insomnia, dizziness , paresthesia , skin redness, rashes, diarrhea, gastritis, nausea, urinary tract infections, increased liver enzymes, myalgia, back pain, nasal congestion, exacerbation of dyspnea, nasal congestion, rhinitis, sinusitis, fevers, abnormal hepatic function tests, absent reflexes, amnesia (transient global), amnesia, anorgasmia, anterior chamber eye hemorrhage, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, arthritis, auditory impairment, basal cell carcinoma (Loeb 2015), breast hypertrophy, burning sensation of eyes, cardiac failure, cataract, cerebrovascular hemorrhage, colitis, cystitis, depression, diaphoresis, diplopia, dry eye syndrome, dysphagia, ECG abnormality, ejaculatory disorder, exfoliative dermatitis, falling, gastroenteritis, genital edema, gingivitis, glossitis, gout, herpes simplex infection, hyperglycemia, hypernatremia, hypersensitivity reaction, hypertension, hypertonia, hypoglycemia, increased bronchial secretions, increased intraocular pressure, ischemic heart disease, laryngitis, leukopenia, malignant melanoma (Li 2014; Loeb 2015), migraine, myasthenia, mydriasis, myocardial infarction, neuralgia, neuropathy, orthostatic hypotension, otalgia, peripheral edema, pharyngitis, photophobia, priapism, prolonged erection, pulmonary hemorrhage, rectal hemorrhage, retinal edema, retinal hemorrhage, retinal vascular disease, rupture of tendon, seizure, severe sickle cell crisis (vaso-occlusive crisis in patients with pulmonary hypertension associated with sickle cell disease), skin photosensitivity, stomatitis, syncope, synovitis, tachycardia, transient ischemic attacks, unstable diabetes, urinary incontinence, ventricular arrhythmia, vitreous detachment, and vitreous traction.

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